60-Second Science

Science news and technology updates from Scientific American. Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science.

Seeing One Solar Eclipse May Not Be Enough (8/2017)

David Baron, author of the new book American Eclipse, talks about how seeing his first total solar eclipse turned him into an eclipse chaser.    

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Solar Eclipse in 1097 May Be Rock Carving Subject (8/2017)

A petroglyph spotted in Chaco Canyon may depict a total solar eclipse witnessed by the Pueblo people.  

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Social Media Sites Can Profile Your Contacts (8/2017)

Why you should think twice before you give an app access to your phone’s address book.    

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"Textalyzer" Aims at Deadly Distracted Driving (8/2017)

A new device promises to tell police when a driver has been sending messages while behind the wheel, but is it legal? Larry Greenemeier reports.

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Climate Change Fires Up Polar Bear Treadmill (8/2017)

Sea ice is drifting faster in the Arctic—which means polar bears need to walk farther to stay in their native range. Emily Schwing reports.

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No Bull: Lizards Flee When They See Red (8/2017)

Western fence lizards are more spooked by red and gray shirts than they are by blue ones—perhaps because the males have blue bellies themselves. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Celebrities Tweet Like Bots (8/2017)

Celebrity Twitter accounts look a lot like Twitter bots: They tweet regularly, follow relatively few people, and upload a lot of content. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

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Cold Snap Shapes Lizard Survivors (8/2017)

An epic bout of cold weather quickly altered a population of lizards—an example of natural selection in action. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Mediterranean Diet Works--for Upper Crust (8/2017)

Italians who stuck closely to the heart-healthy diet had fewer heart attacks and strokes—but only if they were well-off and/or college educated. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Screams Heard Round the Animal World (7/2017)

Humans appear well equipped to recognize the alarm calls of other animals—perhaps because sounds of distress tend to have higher frequencies. Karen Hopkin reports.

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