60-Second Science

Science news and technology updates from Scientific American. Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science.

Mosquitos to Other Flying Insects: Do You Even Generate Lift? (10/2017)

Mosquitos stealthily float off us after filling up, by virtue of fast wingbeats that generate almost instant lift with only an imperceptible additional push from the legs.    

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Keep Your Wi-Fi off KRACK (10/2017)

Up-to-date software, apps, browsers and router software offer the best protection against a potential flaw in wi-fi security called a key reinstallation attack, or KRACK.  

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Ships at Sea Stoke Lightning Strikes (10/2017)

Exhaust fumes from oceangoing vessels lead to an almost doubling of lightning activity over shipping lanes compared to adjacent areas of the sea.  

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Gamers Wanted to Attack Food Toxin (10/2017)

By playing the online game Foldit, players might help design an enzyme that can stop aflatoxins from making millions sick.

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Even Jellyfish Need a Nap (10/2017)

Jellyfish exhibit signs of a sleep state, which could mean that sleep predates the evolutionary development of central nervous systems.  

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Squirrels Chunk Their Buried Treasure (10/2017)

Under certain circumstances squirrels will bury all of the same kind of nut near one another, a mnemonic strategy known as chunking.  

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Cougar Calls Get Big Bear Reactions (10/2017)

Black bears and cougars share the Vancouver countryside, but not happily.

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Biometric Identifies You in a Heartbeat (10/2017)

Like fingerprints and facial recognition, the shape and beat of your heart can be used to verify your identity. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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When We Fly to Mars, Microbes Will, Too (10/2017)

The microbes that live in and on our bodies will colonize a human-manned spacecraft to Mars—but will the spacecraft's microbiome be safe? Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Nobel in Chemistry for Seeing Biomolecules in Action (10/2017)

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in...

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