All In The Mind (ABC)

An exploration of all things mental, All in the Mind is about the brain and behaviour, and the fascinating connections between them.

On being a dog (7/2018)

If you love your pet dog, do they love you? This question intrigued Professor of Neuroscience Gregory Berns. He wanted to know what it’s really like to be a dog—if they feel the same emotions and have similar thoughts to us. So he persuaded his own dog to get into an MRI machine for a brain scan. He’s now trained 100 dogs to go into the scanner and they think it’s a fun game.

Tics, twitches, and Tourette's (7/2018)

Adam Ladell was delighted to be runner-up in The Voice on Australian TV a few years ago. He’s a talented and confident singer—but offstage it’s a slightly different story. He caused a stir at school with his involuntary repetitive movements and loud, inappropriate vocal twitches which are part of his Tourette syndrome. Adam talks to us about working with Tourette’s and developing his performance skills.

Optimism and hope—with Martin Seligman (7/2018)

Are you an optimist or a pessimist? Optimism may protect you from depression. But pessimism could be roughly equivalent to smoking more than 2 packs of cigarettes a day. Known as The Father of Positive Psychology, Professor Martin Seligman continues his talk to an Australian audience about how to promote human flourishing, and positive education.

Positive psychology—with Martin Seligman (6/2018)

During the 1960s the field of psychology focussed on the science of how past trauma creates present symptoms, and how to reduce people’s misery. Professor Martin Seligman wanted to change that focus. He’s become known as the Father of Positive Psychology, and he’s had a profound influence worldwide. In Part 1 of our 2 programs with Martin Seligman, hear him address an exclusive audience in Australia on happiness and human flourishing.

Synesthesia and art (6/2018)

Throughout art history we see a culture of expanded perceptions from artists like Kandinsky, to musicians like Duke Ellington. Artist Nina Norden sees colours and shapes in association with just about everything she experiences. In fact, she can’t imagine how things can exist without a colour and a shape—she has synaesthesia and it forms the basis of her art.

Synesthesia: seeing sounds, hearing colours (6/2018)

For some people the number six is red and music evokes a range of colours and shapes. Seeing sounds and hearing colours is one type of synesthesia—where the senses are crossed.  Meet an 11-year-old girl who was surprised to find out that not everyone sees colourful auras around people, and who feels that numbers have colours and personalities.

Strange brains and rare perceptions (6/2018)

We take it for granted that we have a common understanding of the world. But there are some rare and strange brain disorders which offer a very different insight into our very existence. Their experiences and the latest research illustrate how the brain can shape our lives in unexpected and sometimes brilliant or alarming ways.

Epilepsy and seizure prediction (5/2018)

If you’ve ever witnessed someone having an epileptic seizure you’ll know how frightening it is. And if you have epilepsy you’ll know that the unpredictability of seizures severely impacts your life. It’s like an ‘electrical problem’ in your brain. Researchers are now using AI technology to develop a wearable seizure forecaster.

Creativity and your brain (5/2018)

We humans have ‘creative software’ in our brains—so says neuroscientist and author David Eagleman. We're driven to invent and innovate, yet at the same time we’re attracted to the familiar—and our creativity lives in that tension.

Memories and fears panel discussion from Big Ideas (5/2018)

An extra from All in the Mind—and RN's Big Ideas program with a panel discussion moderated by Lynne Malcolm. From at the 2018 World Science Festival—Probing the Eternal Sunshine: Memories and Fears.